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 Neither the HCG Urine nor serum alone or together is sufficient enough to detect or follow a cancer disease process.  

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HCG (human chorionic gonadotropin) IMM

American Metabolic Laboratories are utilizing chemiluminescence method for detecting most molecular species of the HCG hormone. However, there is NO TEST for the ALPHA subunit of HCG. This may be a reason for a negative test result in an established cancer patient.                

HCG is the pregnancy hormone, and according to Dr. Schandl, the "malignancy hormone." Two different, super-sensitive tests are used, where one will confirm the other. No other laboratory performs these tests at the sensitivity and specificity level we do.  Do-it yourself pregnancy tests, commercial lab reports, and the Navarro test do not accurately report normals below 5.0mIU/mL. Most cancer patients have HCG between 1 - 5. Our cut-off point is less than 1.0.


HCG is a broad-spectrum tumor marker that was found to be elevated in 70 to 80 percent of all malignancies regardless of site. This hormone can be present in men and women in developing cancers several years prior to diagnosis. Self-test pregnancy kits, nor regular clinical laboratory methods can equal the sensitivity developed by Dr. Schandl.


Traditionally, the HCG test is used for detection of pregnancy, ectopic pregnancy, threatened abortions, and miscarriages.  It is also useful in patients with gestational trophoblastic disease, and evaluating and monitoring patients with testicular tumors and molar pregnancy.  HCG levels are extremely useful in following those germ cell neoplasms which produce HCG, particularly trophoblastic neoplasms. Following evacuation of a trophoblastic lesion, HCG should fall to normal in 6-8 weeks and stay there. Oral contraceptive use may delay this fall. Any other delay in the fall, or subsequent rise, is an indication for other further evaluation.  In germ cell neoplasms in the male, HCG and alpha fetoprotein are both useful tumor markers. They can be demonstrated histochemically in tissue to confirm diagnosis, and can be followed in serum to evaluate recurrence. 


Normal levels are less than 1.0 for the test.  The gray zone is 1.0 - 3.0.

Values obtained with different assay methods should not be used interchangeably.